HistoryReviews

Touches Of Exotic Locations Found On Strip

On the Strip, you will see historical touches of King Arthur, Venice, Paris, and Egypt. Each of these themed hotels have their own individual charm and attraction to visitors. The hotel we want to review here is the only one that is shaped like a pyramid. It is the Luxor. Luxor offers visitors impressive touches of Egypt including a Sphinx and other Egyptian art and statues. It is, by far, the most unique hotel in Las Vegas and it has an interesting history.

The Luxor opened in 1993. It was a novelty for sure, but the designers made some basic mistakes in its design. We can never forget that a casino’s design is a key element in drawing people into their gaming area and keeping them there.

When the Luxor opened, it sported a Nile River Ride. It was fairly boring, but it was different. The problem with the ride is that when people entered the front door, people were drawn off to the left, away from the gaming area, to ride the Nile River Ride. It was later removed when remodeling was completed.

onlinenevada.com says of the Luxor;

Not long after the opening, the hotel learned that part of the building was sinking into a soft spot in the usually hard desert floor and adjustments were made to halt it. In 1994, Bennett was forced to leave Circus Circus following a spat with company officials over the former site of the Hacienda Hotel, immediately south of Luxor (where the company would build the Mandalay Bay resort).

Later in the 1990s, the Luxor added a laser light show, an ice rink, and an IMAX theater for showing 3-D films. In 1997, it installed a pair of “stepped” hotel towers and a series of strobe lights on the pyramid. The hotel now had 4,408 rooms and suites. The Luxor’s lobby was extensively renovated with Egyptian columns and painted murals. Other amenities included the hotel’s Tomb and Museum of King Tutankhamen, giving tourists a look at a life-sized reproduction of the original tomb found in Egypt by explorers in 1922.

Read much more about the Luxor’s history here.

 

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