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Seedy, Dark Side Of Las Vegas

shutterstock_319664345Most of us who frequent Las Vegas or live here, don’t see the seedy, dark side of the city. However, it surely exist. Many times however, in fairness, Las Vegas gets a bad rap it doesn’t deserve. In fact, many of the urban legends associated with Las Vegas didn’t actually happen or have their origins here.

Anthony Taille wrote an article, “48 Hours on the Dark Side of Las Vegas.” He details some of the seedy things that happen in Sin City.  Taille says:

Penthouse orgies fueled by pill-pushing hotel employees. A drug house stocked with sex slaves. Hidden homeless encampments underneath the casinos. A shockingly personal investigation shows the real Sin City is even seedier than you imagined.

His story is steamy and X-rated so we won’t post it here, but if you want to read it, it is located here. Be warned, the story is graphic. There is so much that goes on out of sight and behind the scenes that would disgust most people. But, this is part of what Las Vegas is.

If you go to Vegas for the food, shows, and gambling, then stay safe by staying on the main drags. There are some places you should avoid. The main thing to do when in Vegas is use common sense. Don’t go on dark side roads or areas where drugs are likely. Don’t go off with strangers and don’t flash your money.

The crime rate is higher in Las Vegas than comparable cities. Rapes are high and homicides have doubled in the last year. Read a detailed article by Channel 3 News here.

The Virtual Tourist has a detailed list of places to avoid. You can read them here. There is another posting that offers some more advice about where to go and where to avoid. You can find it here.

Las Vegas is great. But, it has its seedy side and its dangers. Stay safe and have fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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